Solo Travel Doesn’t Mean Traveling Alone: Luang Prabang

The night I arrived at Manichan Guesthouse, I met an Englishwoman named Georgina who was traveling solo and interested in many of the things I was – namely, weaving and cooking classes. The next day at breakfast, I met a woman photographer who ran a non-profit working with hilltribe women who were using cameras to document their lives. There was also a Dutch young woman doing an internship at a fair trade store in the Old Town. A few days later, I met a compatriot named Sadaf who is also a solo traveller (and actually traveled overland from Capetown to Cairo!). Two Belgians, Pierre and Roxanne, were also traveling around the world. This has been the first time in my travels that I’ve stayed at a place where so many people were solo travellers, many on career breaks, most at least in their late twenties or thirties. The atmosphere was fantastic, people sitting around the big wooden table in the courtyard talking over breakfast or after a day out. These were interesting conversations, discussing travel and Laos and wide-ranging topics. The guesthouse owner Peter would join in, often over a game of Uno with him and his son. In fact, it became the kind of experience that the books and blogs say solo travel is about – traveling solo so you can meet new people and do things with them. An adorable fur ball puppy just rounded out how ridiculously wonderful my stay was.

Georgina and Jacques

Georgina and Jacques

As part of this, my first morning in Luang Prabang was spent in part in changing my scheduled classes so I could do them at the same time as Georgina. I was very excited to be taking both a cooking and a weaving class, and we thought it would be fun to have company. My plan is to take a cooking class in each country, so I can better compare the cuisines.

I also got to meet up with an old college friend who currently lives in Cambodia but was in town for the first ever Luang Prabang half marathon that weekend. (What are the odds? Apparently pretty high since Georgina also knew someone running the race!)

Saturday's half marathon

Saturday’s half marathon


Then I just wandered through Luang Prabang’s Old City (a UNESCO site), soaking in the laid-back, former French colonial atmosphere. Wats line “Main Street”, while white houses with teak trim remind you of the French colonial presence. Heavy traffic is forbidden in the Old Town, so only an occasional car goes past, though tuk tuks and motor bikes may run you over! Cafés and massage parlors are everywhere. The Old Town is on a peninsula between two rivers, so it’s only a block down a narrow, stair lined alley to get from the main street to the Nam Khan.

I stopped in the small but interesting TAEC museum, a center documenting the different tribes and ethnic groups in Laos. They showcase the different textiles from the different (large) tribes, which I find fascinating. For example, the Hmong use crosstitch a lot, often in orange.

The shop at TAEC also has some amazing examples of textiles, not as cheap as buying it directly from the craftspeople, of course. I bought myself a reversible cap since packing away my wide-brimmed straw hat hadn’t done it any favors. (I was also planning on being around people more in Luang Prabang than I had been elsewhere, and wanted something at least a nod closer to fashionable!)

I ate lunch and blogged at Le Patio, the cafe attached to TAEC, in an effort to avoid the blazing sun. They use some of their textiles as table runners, which I enjoyed idly admiring as I sipped my (almost toothpaste-tasting) mint syrup and bubbly water concoction.

I managed to see a lot of the Old Town without going out in the worst of the sun too much, always a plus!

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